The Men

The Men

Sunday, 19 January 2014

* Capt Charles Henry Alexander

Capt Charles Henry Alexander
“We were all very proud of your gallant son, for on many occasions he had distinguished himself by brave, cool action in time of great stress and danger.  He had had many narrow escapes, and it was the hope of us all he would be equally fortunate in the big operation in which he was engaged.  He had indeed seen through the worst part when the big attack was made, but was struck down on the 8th June.”  (Source: Tom Burnell)

Lieutenant Charles Henry Alexander, 9 Australian Light Trench Mortar Battery, AIF. Killed in action, Belgium, 8 June 1917. Age 33. Born Dublin. Son of David McGowan Alexander and Emily Frances Alexander of 71 Frankfort Avenue, Dublin, Ireland.

Captain Charles Henry Alexander, Trench Mortar Battery Australian Imperial Force, was killed in action on June 8th, 1916. He was the fourth son of Mr. D. M‘G. Alexander, 71 Frankfort Avenue, Rathgar, Dublin, and was educated at the High School, Dublin, and took his Engineering degree in the College of Science. On the outbreak of the war he returned from Australia and received his commission. He
received his Captaincy on the field.
Source: Irish Life Magazine, 27 July 1917 (David Power)

Charles Henry Alexander, Captain Trench Mortar battery, Australian Imperial Force 4th son of David
Toronto Avenue where Charlie Alexander is buried. 
McGowan Alexander, of 71, Frankfort Avenue, Rathgar, Dublin by his wife, Emily Frances, daughter of Francis Power Gahagan; born Dublin 29 December 1883; educated at The High School, and the Royal College of Science there, which he entered with a scholarship, and graduated as Engineer in Science in 1904; became a lecturer in Cawnpore, India, and afterwards at Knox College, Sydney, as Mathematical Master; enlisted July, 1915; obtained a commission the following December; returned to England; served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from November, 1916, and was killed in action at Messines Ridge, 8 June, 1917.  Buried at St. Yves. His Colonel wrote:  “We were all very proud of your gallant son, ofr on many occasions he had distinguished himself by brave, cool action in time of great stress and danger.  He had had many narrow escapes, and it was the hope of us all he would be equally fortunate in the big operation in which he was engaged.  He had indeed seen through the worst part when the big attack was made, but was struck down on the 8th June.”  He was well known in the rowing and football circles in Dublin.

Source: De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour, Volume 4 Page 2. (Researched by Tom Burrell, war historian.)

1 comment:

  1. I am writing a story about Charles's brother John Howard Alexander so drop a line if you're curious.

    ReplyDelete